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2 edition of Effects of insect and virus host plants on transmission of viruses by insects found in the catalog.

Effects of insect and virus host plants on transmission of viruses by insects

K. G. Swenson

Effects of insect and virus host plants on transmission of viruses by insects

by K. G. Swenson

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  • 1 Currently reading

Published by New York Academy of Sciences in [New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Insects as carriers of plant disease.,
  • Plant viruses.,
  • Virus diseases of plants -- Transmission.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences. v. 105.
    StatementK.G. Swenson.
    SeriesMiscellaneous paper -- no.127., Miscellaneous paper (Oregon State University. Agricultural Experiment Station) -- 127.
    ContributionsOregon State University. Agricultural Experiment Station.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. 730-740 ;
    Number of Pages740
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16138823M

    Until recently plant virus diseases have been studied mainly by plant pathologists, and the causative agents have been considered solely as disease agents of plants. Although the host range of most plant-pathogenic viruses is limited to plants, a small number of viruses are now known to infect not only plants but also insects that act as Cited by: 5. TRANSMISSION OF VIRUSES TO VIRUS HOST PLANTS BY INSECT VECTORS. INTRODUCTION. Insects serve as vectors to transmit and spread viruses in the field. Insect transmissions are performed when certain viruses, e.g. luteoviruses, are non mechanically transmissible or, when viruses occurring in mixed infections, need to be cleaned up by .

      Arboviruses – viruses transmitted by insects such as mosquitoes – pose a considerable threat to both human and animal health. Despite that, not enough is known about the complex interactions. In Virus-Insect-Plant Interactions, the world's leading scientists discuss the latest breakthroughs in understanding the biological and ecological factors that define these complex transmission systems and how this knowledge might be used to our advantage in producing innovative, user and environmentally friendly approaches to controlling the spread of plant pathogens by insects.

      Different terms or categories used for describing the relationship between vectors and viruses give some indication of the behavior of the virus in the vector during transmission or mechanism of virus transmission by vector. The most threatening property of the insect vector is its wide host : V. M. Chavan. The mechanisms of virus transmission and plant resistance to many emerging plant viruses are not well understood. Source: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE submitted to MECHANISM OF INSECT VECTOR TRANSMISSION OF PLANT VIRUSES AND NOVEL FORMS OF RESISTANCE AGAINST INSECT VECTORED PLANT VIRUSES.


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Effects of insect and virus host plants on transmission of viruses by insects by K. G. Swenson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Plant Virus Transmission by Insects. transmitted viruses because the vector insect is the only means of virus spread in nature. of virus transmission.

Effects on host phenotypes vary by. Insect virus transmission: Different routes to persistence the detection of new viruses and in probing the molecular basis of behavioural manipulation of hosts that might influence virus.

Roger A.C. Jones, in Advances in Virus Research, Transmission by Arthropod Vectors. Horizontal insect virus transmission by arthropod vectors is considered by insect virologists to be an indirect horizontal transmission pathway as it involves another biological agent (Chen et al., a,b).In contrast to the situation with plant viruses, with one exception arthropod vector.

Insect virus inter-host transmission from insect vectors (mosquitoes, ticks) to a host (humans, plants) or from insect to insect is a dynamic process involving intra-host evolution and adaptation, host competence, viral persistence, and important host–pathogen interactions that facilitate and shape these essential steps in the viral life cycle.

specific insect vector on which the pathogenic organism (some fungi, some bacteria, some nematodes, all protozoa causing disease in plants, and many viruses) depends on for transmission from one plant to another, and on which some pathogens depend on for survival (Fig.

The importance of insect transmission of plant diseases has. Plant-infecting viruses are transmitted by a diverse array of organisms including insects, mites, nematodes, fungi, and plasmodiophorids.

Virus interactions with these vectors are diverse, but there are some commonalities. Generally the infection cycle begins with the vector encountering the virus in the plant and the virus is acquired by the by: Results.

We first examined host plant selection preferences of infective (reared on virus-infected plants) and noninfective (reared on virus-free plants) R.

dual-choice bioassays using an arena in a platform 22 (Fig. 1) infective or noninfective insects were allowed to select BYDV-infected or sham-inoculated wheat plants as their -inoculated plants are Cited by: graphs have provided evidence on insect feeding behaviour and virus transmission.

Recently, stud-ies have shown that viruses can modify vector behaviour in a way that transmission is enhanced.

eLS subject area: Virology How to cite: Fereres, Alberto and Raccah, Benjamin (April ) Plant Virus Transmission by Insects. In: eLS. John Wiley.

Persistent circulative transmission of plant viruses involves complex interactions between the transmitted virus and its insect vector.

Several studies have shown that insect vector proteins are involved in the passage and the transmission of the virus. Interestingly, proteins expressed by bacterial endosymbionts that reside in the insect vector, were also shown to influence the Cited by: Insect flight has been a topic of great interest in aerodynamics due partly to the inability of steady-state theories to explain the lift generated by the tiny wings of insects.

But insect wings are in motion, with flapping and vibrations, resulting in churning and eddies, and the misconception that physics says "bumblebees can't fly" persisted Clade: Pancrustacea.

ent viruses, the insect carrier can trans- mit the virus soon after feeding on a diseased plant. This ability to cause new infections is quickly lost, however, after the insects feed on healthy or im- mune plants.

A starvation period be- fore feeding on infected plants usually increases the transmission efficiency of. from microorganisms to plants and animals, including humans.

However, viruses are beneficial to humans in some instances. One example of this is the relationship that viruses have with insect. Insects are also attacked by a great diversity of viruses, and frequently their infection may cause the death of the infected individuals.

Many insectFile Size: KB. Written by internationally renowned insect virologists, chapters cover all of the major groups of insect pathogenic viruses and suggest future directions for research. The book is divided into three parts: 1) DNA viruses 2) RNA viruses and 3) current hot-topics in insect virology.

Virus groups covered include: Ascoviruses, Baculoviruses, Densoviruses, Entomopoxviruses. This work focuses on those insect virus families found primarily or exclusively in insects, covering all major families of insect-selective viruses except for the baculoviruses which were described in a previous volume of The Viruses series.

Included are the established families of insect viruses, the newly recognized ascovirus family, and the nudiviruses, which probably represent a.

Certain plants in the nightshade family contain withanolides, defensive chemicals known to be harmful to most insect herbivores. Here, Cited by: 7. Plant viruses are viruses that affect all other viruses, plant viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that do not have the molecular machinery to replicate without a viruses can be pathogenic to higher plants.

Most plant viruses are rod-shaped, with protein discs forming a tube surrounding the viral genome; isometric particles are another common structure. Insects are infected by a diverse medley of viruses, and this volume focuses on those insect virus families that are found primarily or exclusively in insects.

All major families of insect-selective viruses are covered except for the baculo­ viruses, which were described in a separate volume of The Viruses by: FIGURE A Viruses localize to different sites in the plant-feeding insect vector depending on their modes of transmission.

Non-circulative viruses bind to the insect stylet (see inset) or foregut. Non-propagative circulative (yellow circles) viruses are generally phloem limited and move through the insect body via the midgut or hindgut.

stricted to viruses transmitted by insects of the Hemipteroid assemblage. In nonpersis-tent transmission, insects can inoculate the virus into plants for only a few minutes af-ter acquisition and the insect loses the virus within a few minutes and upon molting.

In persistent transmission, insects can inoculate the acquired virus for much longer. 1) Circulative, propagative and Persistent Transmission: The virus circulates in the host but actually infects insect cells and replicates in the vector.

2) Non-Persistent and Non-circulative (NC) Transmission: The virus binds the stylet during feeding and is released when the insect secrets saliva on a new feeding place.

Transmission-Stylet Borne. It is proposed that the effects of viruses on overall host plant quality are dependent on the mode of transmission 2,5. Although this appears Cited by: 2.

Diseases spread by insects are a major cause of illness to children and adults worldwide. The following is information about West Nile virus, Lyme disease, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. West Nile Virus. In the United States, West Nile virus and outbreaks of various types of encephalitis get plenty of media coverage.Nonbiting Flies and Disease Dale R.

Lindsay and Harvey I. Scudder Annual Review of Entomology Nonpersistent Transmission of Plant Viruses by Aphids T P Pirone, and and K F Harris Annual Review of Phytopathology Leafhopper and Planthopper Transmission of Plant Viruses L R Nault, and and E D AmmarCited by: